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July 2014
23

In the sequence of revolutions that remade the Atlantic world from 1776 to 1825, the Haitian Revolution is rarely given its due, yet without it there is much that cannot be accounted for. The revolutions—American, French, Haitian, and Spanish-American—should be seen as interconnected, with each helping to radicalize the next.

July 2014
22
Haitian President Antoine Simon (1908-1911) with some of his officers, 1909.
Image: Courtesy of the Centre International de Documentation et d’Information Haïtienne, Caribéenne et Afro-canadienne (CIDIHCA).

Haitian President Antoine Simon (1908-1911) with some of his officers, 1909.

Image: Courtesy of the Centre International de Documentation et d’Information Haïtienne, Caribéenne et Afro-canadienne (CIDIHCA).

July 2014
22
Today in Haitian History - July 22, 1795 - Treaty of Basel signed between France and Spain. 
While this second Treaty of Basel guaranteed the end of hostilities between the French Convention and the Spanish Crown, for both countries’ overseas colonies, the Treaty had larger implications as Spain ceded its share of Hispaniola (modern day Dominican Republic) to France.
In January 1801, assuming that Santo Domingo was now part of the French Empire (although never completely integrated to the latter), Toussaint Louverture pressured the local Spanish administration to give it up fully to his (and thus French) authority. Still in 1801 (July), Louverture proceeded in creating a Constitution for the entire island of Hispaniola in which he abolished slavery on both sides of the island and imposed new laws. Louverture’s gesture did come to cause much animosity between Dominicans and Haitians in later years. 
Map: Courtesy of The Louverture Project.

Today in Haitian History - July 22, 1795 - Treaty of Basel signed between France and Spain. 

While this second Treaty of Basel guaranteed the end of hostilities between the French Convention and the Spanish Crown, for both countries’ overseas colonies, the Treaty had larger implications as Spain ceded its share of Hispaniola (modern day Dominican Republic) to France.

In January 1801, assuming that Santo Domingo was now part of the French Empire (although never completely integrated to the latter), Toussaint Louverture pressured the local Spanish administration to give it up fully to his (and thus French) authority. Still in 1801 (July), Louverture proceeded in creating a Constitution for the entire island of Hispaniola in which he abolished slavery on both sides of the island and imposed new laws. Louverture’s gesture did come to cause much animosity between Dominicans and Haitians in later years. 

Map: Courtesy of The Louverture Project.

July 2014
21

Anonymous asked

I like you new layout and I really enjoy the fact that you guys really invest time in the overall apparence of your blog.

Hello. Yes, we do. Glad you like it. Many thanks. 

#ask   
July 2014
21
Haitian President Louis Borno (right) with American Secretary of the Navy Edwin Denby (left) in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, June 14, 1922. 
While more modern scholarship challenges some previously believed notions about Louis Borno’s presidency and his relationship with Washington during the U.S. Occupation of Haiti (1915-1934), to a large extent, despite some economic prosperity and stability in Haiti until the 1929 riots, most Haitian historiography still depicts Borno as the greatest collaborator to American interest in Haiti and one of the finest examples of the “Mulatto  oligarchy” in power until 1946. 
Whether Borno’s intentions and time in office (1922-1930) can be viewed only in those terms today is debatable, still, for the burgeoning Black urban middle class of the 1920s and 1930s, Borno had “sold out” Haiti to “Uncle Sam.”
Original Image Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images. 

Haitian President Louis Borno (right) with American Secretary of the Navy Edwin Denby (left) in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, June 14, 1922. 

While more modern scholarship challenges some previously believed notions about Louis Borno’s presidency and his relationship with Washington during the U.S. Occupation of Haiti (1915-1934), to a large extent, despite some economic prosperity and stability in Haiti until the 1929 riots, most Haitian historiography still depicts Borno as the greatest collaborator to American interest in Haiti and one of the finest examples of the “Mulatto  oligarchy” in power until 1946. 

Whether Borno’s intentions and time in office (1922-1930) can be viewed only in those terms today is debatable, still, for the burgeoning Black urban middle class of the 1920s and 1930s, Borno had “sold out” Haiti to “Uncle Sam.”

Original Image Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images

July 2014
21
Follow ♦ Read ♦ Ask/Contribute ♦ Promote us by reblogging this post!

FollowReadAsk/Contribute ♦ Promote us by reblogging this post!

#admin   #promo   
July 2014
21

Watch Professor Matthew J. Smith, Lecturer in the Department of History and Anthropology at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica and author of the book Red and Black in Haiti: Radicalism, Conflict, and Political Change, 1934-1957   which I highly recommend if you want to better understand the various consequences of the US Marine Occupation on pre-Duvalier Haitian politics and the role of the Haitian left in the same period —  in a conference at Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC | CRDI).

In this special lecture entitled The Caribbean and the Roots of the Haitian Diaspora, Prof. Smith looks at Haitian immigration. 

July 2014
21

Anonymous asked

So happy to see a blog with references dedicated to Haitian History.

Hello. Thank you for the compliment and you are very welcome. 

#ask   #anon   
July 2014
21
Hello, here is another edition of our “weekly” bulletin.
o1. First of all, we are very sorry for not updating as much as we used to. School and work have, in a large measure, prevented us for updating the blog more regularly. 
o2. New Layout! We got a bit tired of the previous one and felt this new, brighter look would be appropriate for the season.  We used old images of Port-Au-Prince from the Centre International de Documentation et d’Information Haïtienne, Caribéenne et Afro-canadienne (CIDIHCA) and the Bibliothèque nationale de France - Gallica.
o3. Speaking of images, we’ve updated our FAQ to reflect some of the more recent questions we’ve received at this blog and at our gmail address.
o4. We updated and added new documents to our Primary Source page. (It seems many of you are reading primary sources on Haiti, as a good number of those have been digitalized and are freely accessible on the Web. While this is great news, I still think it wise to review this little guide on reading and interpreting primary sources, to make sure you can both appreciate the value of those documents while making sure not to take all its content too literally.) We are always glad to know of new additions, if you have any documents you’d like to suggest to this list, contact us.
That’s all. Thank you for reading and have a wonderful week. =)

Hello, here is another edition of our “weekly” bulletin.

o1. First of all, we are very sorry for not updating as much as we used to. School and work have, in a large measure, prevented us for updating the blog more regularly. 

o2. New Layout! We got a bit tired of the previous one and felt this new, brighter look would be appropriate for the season.  We used old images of Port-Au-Prince from the Centre International de Documentation et d’Information Haïtienne, Caribéenne et Afro-canadienne (CIDIHCA) and the Bibliothèque nationale de France - Gallica.

o3. Speaking of images, we’ve updated our FAQ to reflect some of the more recent questions we’ve received at this blog and at our gmail address.

o4. We updated and added new documents to our Primary Source page. (It seems many of you are reading primary sources on Haiti, as a good number of those have been digitalized and are freely accessible on the Web. While this is great news, I still think it wise to review this little guide on reading and interpreting primary sources, to make sure you can both appreciate the value of those documents while making sure not to take all its content too literally.) We are always glad to know of new additions, if you have any documents you’d like to suggest to this list, contact us.

That’s all. Thank you for reading and have a wonderful week. =)

July 2014
21
Today in Haitian History - July 21, 1961 - François Duvalier  founds city after himself. 
 Although the government remained seated in Port-Au-Prince, in 1961, Dr. François Duvalier, then-President of Haiti, decided to rename the city of Cabaret (in Western Haiti) after himself. The city was thus re-baptized “Duvalierville.” While threats were used to “encourage” the financing of the city, very little came of the project. In 1986, following the departure of Jean-Claude Duvalier, François Duvalier’s son and successor, the city formally dropped the name.
Original Image Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images. 

Today in Haitian History - July 21, 1961 - François Duvalier  founds city after himself. 

Although the government remained seated in Port-Au-Prince, in 1961, Dr. François Duvalier, then-President of Haiti, decided to rename the city of Cabaret (in Western Haiti) after himself. The city was thus re-baptized “Duvalierville.” While threats were used to “encourage” the financing of the city, very little came of the project. In 1986, following the departure of Jean-Claude Duvalier, François Duvalier’s son and successor, the city formally dropped the name.

Original Image Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images

July 2014
20
Haitian President Paul Eugène Magloire (far left) and his American counterpart, Dwight D. Eisenhower (far right) with their respective wives (on opposite sides), Washington, D.C., United States,1955. 

Original Caption: “1/28/1955-Washington, DC-President and Mrs. Eisenhower are shown with President Paul E. Magloire of Haiti and his “First Lady,” when the Eisenhowers were guests of honor at a dinner given in a Washington hotel by President Magloire. The Chief Executive of the Haitian Republic is here on a nine-day official visit to Washington and New York. After which he will make an unofficial six-day visit to Nashville, Chicago and Boston.”

Image and Caption Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images. 

Haitian President Paul Eugène Magloire (far left) and his American counterpart, Dwight D. Eisenhower (far right) with their respective wives (on opposite sides), Washington, D.C., United States,1955. 

Original Caption: “1/28/1955-Washington, DC-President and Mrs. Eisenhower are shown with President Paul E. Magloire of Haiti and his “First Lady,” when the Eisenhowers were guests of honor at a dinner given in a Washington hotel by President Magloire. The Chief Executive of the Haitian Republic is here on a nine-day official visit to Washington and New York. After which he will make an unofficial six-day visit to Nashville, Chicago and Boston.”

Image and Caption Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images

July 2014
20
Today in Haitian History - July 20, 1953 - Death of Haitian Dumarsais Estimé. 
Made president thanks to military intervention, Estimé held office from August 1946 to (more or less) May 1950. While some claim that the “Mulatto  oligarchy” that had characterized Haitian politics since the US Marine Occupation had essentially been replaced by a “Black oligarchy” trough Estimé’s election, he nevertheless remains one of the rare modern Haitian presidents to be remembered positively by his peers. 
Although most of his projects to modernize Haiti seem to have had very little impact on the overall country (despite some of the post-WWII prosperity that Haiti experienced), Estimé’s most famous accomplishment remains the lavish Exposition internationale du bicentenaire de Port-au-Prince held in late 1949-1950.
Original Image Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images. 

Today in Haitian History - July 20, 1953 - Death of Haitian Dumarsais Estimé. 

Made president thanks to military intervention, Estimé held office from August 1946 to (more or less) May 1950. While some claim that the “Mulatto  oligarchy” that had characterized Haitian politics since the US Marine Occupation had essentially been replaced by a “Black oligarchy” trough Estimé’s election, he nevertheless remains one of the rare modern Haitian presidents to be remembered positively by his peers.

Although most of his projects to modernize Haiti seem to have had very little impact on the overall country (despite some of the post-WWII prosperity that Haiti experienced), Estimé’s most famous accomplishment remains the lavish Exposition internationale du bicentenaire de Port-au-Prince held in late 1949-1950.

Original Image Credit: Courtesy of Corbis Images